Summer Science Experiments for Kids

3 min
Jul 15, 2024
Dive into a series of engaging and educational summer science experiments that will captivate kids and ignite their curiosity through hands-on activities. Summer offers the perfect opportunity for children to explore the wonders of science through enjoyable and educational experiments. With sunny days and ample free time, kids can engage in hands-on activities that stimulate curiosity and foster a love for learning. Here are some thrilling summer science experiments to keep kids entertained throughout the season.

Bubble Snake

Create long, colorful bubble snakes using simple household materials.
Materials:
  • A plastic bottle
  • A sock
  • Dish soap
  • Water
  • Food coloring (optional)
  • A shallow dish
Instructions:
  1. Cut the bottom off the plastic bottle.
  2. Stretch the sock over the cut end of the bottle and secure it with a rubber band.
  3. Mix dish soap and water in a shallow dish.
  4. Dip the sock-covered end of the bottle into the soapy water.
  5. Blow through the mouth of the bottle to create a long bubble snake.
  6. Add food coloring to the sock for colorful bubbles!

Walking Water

Explore capillary action and color mixing with this simple experiment.
Materials:
  • Clear cups or glasses
  • Water
  • Food coloring
  • Paper towels
Instructions:
  1. Fill three cups with water and add different food coloring to each (e.g., red, yellow, blue).
  2. Place an empty cup between each colored cup.
  3. Fold paper towels into strips and place one end in a colored cup and the other end in an empty cup.
  4. Watch as the water "walks" through the paper towels and mixes in the empty cups, creating new colors.

DIY Sundial

Learn about the movement of the sun by making your own sundial.
Materials:
  • A paper plate
  • A pencil
  • Markers
  • A clock or watch
Instructions:
  1. Push the pencil through the center of the paper plate.
  2. Place the plate outside in a sunny spot at the beginning of the hour.
  3. Check the position of the pencil's shadow and mark it on the plate with the corresponding hour.
  4. Repeat this every hour to create a working sundial that tracks the time based on the sun's position.

Balloon Rocket

Discover the principles of rocket propulsion with a balloon rocket experiment.
Materials:
  • A balloon
  • A long piece of string
  • A straw
  • Tape
Instructions:
  1. Thread the string through the straw.
  2. Tie the ends of the string to two objects to create a straight line (e.g., chairs or doorknobs).
  3. Inflate the balloon and pinch the end to prevent air from escaping.
  4. Tape the balloon to the straw.
  5. Let go of the balloon and watch it zoom along the string as it deflates.

Crystal Sun Catchers

Grow beautiful crystals and make sun catchers to hang in a sunny window.
Materials:
  • Borax
  • Water
  • Food coloring
  • Pipe cleaners
  • String
  • A jar
Instructions:
  1. Shape the pipe cleaners into desired shapes (e.g., stars, hearts).
  2. Tie a string to each pipe cleaner shape and suspend it in a jar.
  3. Boil water and dissolve borax in it until no more will dissolve (saturated solution).
  4. Add food coloring to the solution.
  5. Pour the solution into the jar, covering the pipe cleaners.
  6. Let it sit overnight to allow crystals to form on the pipe cleaners.
  7. Remove the crystals and hang them in a sunny window.

Oobleck

Make a non-Newtonian fluid and explore its unique properties.
Materials:
  • Cornstarch
  • Water
  • Food coloring (optional)
  • A bowl
Instructions:
  1. Mix cornstarch and water in a bowl (roughly 2 parts cornstarch to 1 part water).
  2. Add food coloring if desired.
  3. Play with the mixture, observing how it behaves like a solid when you apply pressure and like a liquid when you let it sit.
  4. Experiment with squeezing, poking, and letting it drip through your fingers.
  These summer science experiments are both fun and educational, helping kids grasp scientific concepts through interactive activities. Whether it's exploring capillary action, understanding the sun's movement, or observing non-Newtonian fluids, these experiments will inspire young minds and create unforgettable memories. Gather your materials, head outside, and embark on a summer of scientific discovery!